Mr Holford's site for English

Word of the Day

‘In the beginning was the Word …’ John 1:1

Words are so important in communicating meaning. Let’s make a note of new words we learn, words we like or words that we think are misused. If you quote a dictionary, make sure you acknowledge the source. For example:

defenestration (noun) the action of throwing someone out of a window. (Oxford Dictionary of English)

If you want it to be Word of the Day when you are next in class, you must be able to say the word, spell it, define it and correctly use it in a sentence.

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179 Comments »

  1. bourgeois
    (adjective) of or characteristic of the middle class, typically with reference to its perceived materialistic values or conventional attitudes

    Comment by Hope Hyatt — March 28, 2012 @ 7:07 am | Reply

  2. ethnocentrism
    (adjective) evading other peoples cultures according to the standards of one’s own culture

    Comment by Hope Hyatt — March 26, 2012 @ 7:12 am | Reply

  3. paraphernalia
    (noun) miscellaneous articles esp. the equipment needed for a particular activity

    Comment by Hope Hyatt — March 22, 2012 @ 2:42 pm | Reply

  4. bagatelle
    (noun) a thing of little importance, a very easy task

    Comment by Hope Hyatt — March 12, 2012 @ 7:29 am | Reply

  5. My WOrd of The Day is: ETHANOL
    definition: (noun) systematic chemical named for ethyl alcohol

    Comment by Hope Hyatt — February 29, 2012 @ 5:12 pm | Reply

  6. Pahoehoe
    Basaltic lava forming smooth undulating or ropy masses. Often contrasted with aa .

    I found some pahoehoe once on a bushwalk.

    🙂

    Comment by Katie C — July 25, 2011 @ 11:16 am | Reply

  7. KABBALAH
    noun
    the ancient Jewish tradition of mystical interpretation of the Bible, first transmitted orally and using esoteric methods

    Comment by Bec Waters 9 — May 30, 2011 @ 7:15 pm | Reply

  8. HADITH: A collection of traditions containing sayings of the prophet Muhammad that, with accounts of his daily practise( the Sunna ), constiute the major source of guidance of Muslims apart from Koran.

    Comment by Imogen Schaefer — May 19, 2011 @ 7:45 pm | Reply

  9. This is my word SCHADENFREUDE,
    noun
    [mass noun]
    pleasure derived by someone from another person’s misfortune.
    From the Online Oxford dictionary.

    Comment by kate Ryan — May 19, 2011 @ 8:18 am | Reply

  10. Hey Mr Holford.

    HOLFORD – habitational name from any of various places named Holford, for example in Somerset, or from Holdforth in Durham, so named from Old English hol ‘hollow’, ‘sunken’, ‘deep’ + ford ‘ford’.

    🙂 Thankyouu.

    Comment by Adelaide Vivers. — May 18, 2011 @ 7:34 pm | Reply

    • Okay, so you might think my name is interesting (?!) but you know I don’t like proper nouns for word of the day!

      Comment by peterholford — May 20, 2011 @ 8:06 pm | Reply

  11. MUNGO– A dumpster diver, one who extracts valuable things from trash
    People who are very poor can sometimes become mungo’s .

    Comment by Skye Ramsay — May 17, 2011 @ 7:32 pm | Reply

    • The only meaning I know for ‘mungo’ is: cloth made from recycled woven or felted material. I have never heard the word used the way you describe!

      Comment by peterholford — May 17, 2011 @ 9:29 pm | Reply

  12. HAUGHTY-adj. Condescending: behaving in a superior, condescending, or arrogant way
    “He always seemed haughty in company meetings.”

    Comment by Sophia Thatcher — May 17, 2011 @ 6:23 pm | Reply

  13. EGREGIOUS: means conspicuously and outrageously bad or reprehensible; The children were acting very egregious in class.

    Comment by Skye Ramsay — May 16, 2011 @ 6:57 pm | Reply

    • What a brilliant word! In the form ‘egregious’ it is an adjective, which means it describes a noun. In that sense, the sentence would be describing behaviour: “The children’s behaviour was very egregious.” The sentence you have provided is an adverbial sense (describing a verb): “The children were acting very egregiously in class.”

      Comment by peterholford — May 16, 2011 @ 7:54 pm | Reply

  14. OPULENT – (adjective) ostentatiously rich and luxurious or lavish.
    e.g. the opulent comfort of a limousine.
    From the New Oxford American Dictionary

    Comment by Nicola — May 14, 2011 @ 10:39 am | Reply

  15. ALMANAC(noun) : An annual calendar containing important dates and statistical information such as astronomical data and tide tables.
    e.g I need to check my almanac to see the tide.
    from Mac Dictionary

    Comment by Alison Cala — May 11, 2011 @ 7:57 pm | Reply

    • hahaha plants vs zombies ali??

      Comment by Katie C — July 25, 2011 @ 4:20 pm | Reply

  16. Incinerate– verb- destroy something by burning.
    I must incinerate the garbage.
    🙂

    Comment by Sophia Thatcher — May 10, 2011 @ 9:12 pm | Reply

  17. Agape– (of the mouth) wide open, esp. with surprise or wonder.

    I found agape on the internet!

    Comment by Sophia Thatcher — May 9, 2011 @ 12:13 pm | Reply

  18. Word of the Day

    My word of the day is Vogue (you have probably heard of it from the fashion magazine Vogue). 

    Definition: the popular taste at a given time.

    In a Sentance: “Red high heel shoes are the next vogue”

    Comment by Brianna — May 7, 2011 @ 3:10 pm | Reply

  19. Hi Mr Holford,
    My word of the day is Oklahoma
    It is a state in south-west central America, north of Texas.
    “I went to Oklahoma For a family holiday.”
    It sounds like a cool word.

    Comment by Katie C — May 5, 2011 @ 7:36 pm | Reply

    • Yes – the word does have a nice ring to it, but I never give Word of the Day to a proper noun. Sorry.

      Comment by peterholford — May 6, 2011 @ 6:12 pm | Reply

  20. kitsch :

    art, objects, or design considered to be in poor taste because of excessive garishness or sentimentality, but sometimes appreciated in an ironic or knowing way : the lava lamp is an example of sixties kitsch | [as adj. ] kitsch decor.

    Comment by Skyeramsay — May 4, 2011 @ 8:17 pm | Reply

  21. Advantageousness (noun): of advantage; furnishing convenience or opportunity; profitable; useful; beneficial.
    DEFINITION FROM THE MACQUARIE DICTIONARY.

    Comment by Weeny Morton — May 1, 2011 @ 1:38 pm | Reply

    • I have never seen this form of the word ADVANTAGE. I’m not a big fan of the Macquarie Dictionary – much prefer the Oxford. ADVANTAGEOUS is the adjectival form of the noun ADVANTAGE which means ‘a condition or circumstance that puts one in a favourable or superior position’. Normally, if you wanted to create a noun form of an adjective, you would just drop the ending, not add another one!

      Comment by peterholford — May 4, 2011 @ 6:48 pm | Reply

  22. Narcissism – the erotic interest of ones self and one’s physical appearance.

    Comment by brigite low 🙂 — April 28, 2011 @ 10:45 am

    Comment by peterholford — April 28, 2011 @ 7:37 pm | Reply

    • I like it – a great word Brigitte. I will make it word of the day when you’re next in English (Monday 9 May). Have a great time at camp!

      Comment by peterholford — April 28, 2011 @ 7:38 pm | Reply

  23. Verisimilitude: Noun
    the appearance of being true or real.
    the detail gives the novel some verisimilitude.

    Comment by Connie — April 27, 2011 @ 6:41 pm | Reply

  24. Postmodernism: a late 20th-century style and concept in the arts, architecture, and criticism that represents a departure from modernism and has at its heart a general distrust of grand theories and ideologies as well as a problematical relationship with any notion of “art.”

    The appropriation of images from past art or popular culture is a central strategy of Postmodernism.
    🙂

    Comment by Sophia Thatcher — April 27, 2011 @ 6:39 pm | Reply

  25. my awesome word of the day is antidisestablishmentarianism
    it means opposition to the withdrawal of state support or recognition from an established church, especially the Anglican Church in 19th-century England.
    🙂

    Comment by Sophia Thatcher — April 6, 2011 @ 7:53 pm | Reply

  26. extortion– the practice of obtaining something. 🙂

    Comment by Sophia Thatcher — April 6, 2011 @ 7:48 pm | Reply

    • mr holford taught us that one 😀

      Comment by Sophia Thatcher — April 6, 2011 @ 7:54 pm | Reply

    • Hi Sophia – well done on being the first Year 8 student to lodge a word of the day this year! Did you miss the ending of the definition? My dictionary says “the practice of obtaining something, especially money, through force or threats.”

      Comment by peterholford — April 6, 2011 @ 10:20 pm | Reply

  27. Serendipity– the occurrence and development of events by chance in a happy or beneficial way

    Comment by Bec Waters 9 — March 30, 2011 @ 12:21 pm | Reply

  28. quadrivium
    a medieval university curriculum involving the “mathematical arts”
    =]

    Comment by Bec Waters 9 — March 15, 2011 @ 8:27 am | Reply

    • Excellent word (although I don’t know when I would need to use it) – plus, first ‘Word of the Day’ for more than six months!

      Comment by peterholford — March 15, 2011 @ 6:41 pm | Reply

  29. DIAPHANOUS
    Meaning: almost transparent
    Sentence: “The stain glass window was very diaphanous as I could almost see the clouds outside clearly.”
    Source: The Australian Integrated Compact Dictionary and Thesaurus

    Comment by Phoebe Parry — August 30, 2010 @ 8:34 pm | Reply

  30. Equilibrium
    (noun): a state in which opposing forces or influences are balanced

    i found this word while i was reading my book.

    Comment by Christie Turnbull — August 24, 2010 @ 9:06 pm | Reply

  31. My word of the day is MALEVOLENT!
    Meaning: wishing evil or harm to another or others
    From: Dictionary.com

    I found this whilst researching for my report! I thought it was pretty cool!

    Comment by Phoebe Parry — August 9, 2010 @ 6:58 pm | Reply

  32. aberration:

    a departure from what is normal, usual, or expected, typically one that is unwelcome

    its a noun 🙂

    Comment by jasmine bazzica — August 4, 2010 @ 7:28 pm | Reply

  33. Satchel: a bag carried on the shoulder by a long strap and typically closed by a flap.

    ” hey don’t do that “that’s my satchel ….”

    Comment by Amelia Wiggins — August 3, 2010 @ 10:03 am | Reply

  34. Fantastical: adjective

    1.Appealing to fancy
    2.Existing only in the imagination

    from the http://www.answers.com/topic/fantastical website

    Comment by Georgia White — July 29, 2010 @ 9:17 pm | Reply

  35. MELANCHOLY
    i found this word while i was reading this book. I wanted to know what it meant and this is what it came up as.

    –NOUN
    1.
    a gloomy state of mind, esp. when habitual or prolonged; depression.
    2.
    sober thoughtfulness; pensiveness.

    –ADJECTIVE
    1.
    affected with, characterized by, or showing melancholy; mournful; depressed: a melancholy mood.
    2.
    causing melancholy or sadness; saddening: a melancholy occasion.
    3.
    soberly thoughtful; pensive.

    Comment by Christie Turnbull — July 22, 2010 @ 8:13 pm | Reply

  36. Adoration
    Love and respect deeply.
    (The Adoration of Jenna Fox, Mary E Pearson)

    Comment by Eliza Pitt — July 21, 2010 @ 7:37 pm | Reply

  37. Got it from Macbook dictionary- hypanthium means: a cuplike or tubular enlargement of the receptacle of a flower, loosely surrounding the gynoecium or united with it.

    Comment by Holly McDonald — July 20, 2010 @ 7:55 pm | Reply

  38. My word of the day is: Curious
    Meaning: (Adjective) Eager to learn or know.
    (The Adoration of Jenna Fox – by Mary E Pearson)

    Comment by Shannon — July 5, 2010 @ 10:50 am | Reply

    • Good one: I especially like it that you found the word in the book we’re reading. Have you finished it? What are your thoughts about the novel?

      Comment by peterholford — July 5, 2010 @ 8:37 pm | Reply

  39. My word of the day is: aberrant
    Meaning: deviating from the proper course.
    (www.vocabula.com/vrbestwords.asp)

    Comment by shannon — June 20, 2010 @ 2:33 pm | Reply

  40. Dystopia– a nightmare vision of society often as one dominated by a totalitarian state. (verb) dystopian.

    Utopia– an imagined perfect place or state of things.

    So would the verb of utopia by utopian?

    Comment by Emily (Jelly) — June 17, 2010 @ 7:40 pm | Reply

    • Utopia and dystopia are both nouns. The adjectival forms would be utopian and dystopian. I don’t think there would be a verb form. At least I can’t think of one. I’ll look in my giant Oxford dictionary when I get home. However, your definitions are good. Where did you get them? Or did you write them yourself? It’s always good to acknowledge the source of your information.

      Comment by peterholford — June 17, 2010 @ 7:58 pm | Reply

      • Well, let me start again…

        Dystopia– a nightmare vision of society often as one determined by totalitarian state. (Adjective) Dystopian

        Utopia– an imagined perfect place or state. (Adjective) Utopian

        Source- The Australian Concise Oxford Dictionary, third edition

        I was also wondering what concise means so: Concise- (of speech, writing, style, or a person) brief but comprehensive in expression.

        I was going to start this sentence with “and” but, I didn’t and I can’t remember what I was going to say in this sentence.

        Comment by Emily (Jelly) — June 17, 2010 @ 8:14 pm

  41. hierarchical

    arranged in order of rank

    Comment by jasmine bazzica — June 10, 2010 @ 10:14 am | Reply

  42. technocrtically
    an exponent or advocate of technocracy.

    Comment by Eliza Pitt — June 8, 2010 @ 7:26 pm | Reply

    • Hi Pitty, good word, but I think you mean technocrat! The definition you have provided is for the noun, but you have given the adverb form of the word, technocratically. Did you do that because the adverb is longer? Personally I don’t always go for the long words …

      Comment by peterholford — June 9, 2010 @ 5:59 pm | Reply

  43. thingamajig: used to refer to or address a person or thing whose name one has forgotten, does not know, or does not wish to mention

    Comment by millie wiggins — June 7, 2010 @ 11:53 am | Reply

    • Nice word. Very close to thingamabob which is another term for thingummy.

      Comment by peterholford — June 7, 2010 @ 6:35 pm | Reply

  44. My Word of the day is:Lugubrious
    Meaning: Gloomy.
    Source: factacular.com

    Comment by Shannon — June 5, 2010 @ 6:10 pm | Reply

  45. Platitude;
    a pointless, unoriginal, or empty comment or statement made as though it was significant or helpful
    Encarta dictionary
    I heard this one off of Spongebob Square Pants

    Comment by Georgia White — June 4, 2010 @ 6:05 pm | Reply

  46. apparel: noun formal clothing : apparels embroidered ornamentation on ecclesiastical vestments.

    Comment by millie wiggins — June 3, 2010 @ 11:00 am | Reply

  47. habergeon
    Meaning: a sleeveless coat of mail or scale armour
    – New Oxford Dictionary

    Comment by Ella Tindal — May 31, 2010 @ 7:45 pm | Reply

  48. My word of the day is:Confabulate
    Meaning: to chat.
    (homepage.ntlword.com)

    Comment by shannon — May 30, 2010 @ 10:39 am | Reply

  49. dermatosiophobia means the fear of skin brigitte low

    Comment by brigitte — May 28, 2010 @ 11:50 am | Reply

    • This is a new word for me … but I never like disease words … octocentenary is much nicer.

      Comment by peterholford — May 28, 2010 @ 6:42 pm | Reply

  50. OCTOCENTENARY the eight hundredth anniversary of a significant event. by brigitte low

    Comment by brigitte — May 28, 2010 @ 11:44 am | Reply

  51. My word of the day is: Godspeed
    Meaning: Success or fortune.
    When I saw this word I thought of “The Snow Goose” a book we read in English last term, because it has this word in it towards the end.
    (www.buzzle.com)

    Comment by shannon — May 27, 2010 @ 5:30 pm | Reply

  52. fuggetaboutit– to forget about a subject or event that was either being viewed or thought about.

    Comment by Holly McDonald — May 25, 2010 @ 8:16 pm | Reply

  53. nonplus– puzzle someone completely

    Comment by georgia gardner — May 25, 2010 @ 5:08 pm | Reply

  54. My word of the day is: Agrestic
    Meaning: Someone who is rude, uncouth and uncultured
    (www.buzzle.com)

    Comment by shannon — May 24, 2010 @ 5:34 pm | Reply

    • This is an unusual definition for an unusual word. I’ve never seen it used to mean this. My dictionary defines it as follows:
      agrestic adjective (chiefly literary): relating to the country, rural or rustic
      Oxford Dictionary of English

      Comment by peterholford — May 27, 2010 @ 6:25 pm | Reply

  55. fortuitous:
    Happening by accident or chance rather than design.

    I found this word by watching Pirates Of The Carribean 2

    Comment by Sophie M Yr 8A — May 22, 2010 @ 9:13 pm | Reply

  56. My words of the day are: Senescence
    Meaning: Growing old or aging.

    Ennui: Boredom or joblessness.

    Penultimate: Next to last.

    Conundrum: A difficult problem or a situation.

    (www.buzzle.com)

    Comment by shannon — May 21, 2010 @ 4:58 pm | Reply

    • I think ennui is the best one, although conundrum is pretty cool.

      Comment by peterholford — May 21, 2010 @ 6:07 pm | Reply

  57. conventionally– adjective based on or in accordance with what is generally done or believed

    Comment by Emily Morrice — May 20, 2010 @ 7:00 pm | Reply

  58. My word of the day is: Porphyry
    Meaning: (noun) A hard, typically reddish indigenous rock containing crystals of feldspar.
    (word power dictionary).

    My other word of the day is: Floccinaucinihilipilification
    Meaning: (noun) To describe something worthless.
    (Word power dictionary).

    My other word of the day is: Bailiwick
    Meaning: (noun) An area of interest, activity or authority.
    (word power dictionary)

    Comment by shannon — May 20, 2010 @ 6:16 pm | Reply

    • Shannon – I know its a real word, but don’t you think its just a little bit ridiculous? Floccinaucinihilipilification indeed.

      Comment by peterholford — May 20, 2010 @ 7:40 pm | Reply

  59. Word of the day.
    Boondoggle =–noun
    1.
    a product of simple manual skill, as a plaited leather cord for the neck or a knife sheath, made typically by a camper or a scout.
    2.
    work of little or no value done merely to keep or look busy.
    3.
    a project funded by the federal government out of political favoritism that is of no real value to the community or the nation.
    Morgan Fahey yr9b
    from Morgan yr9b

    Comment by morgan fahey — May 19, 2010 @ 9:29 pm | Reply

  60. hi mr H
    my word of the day is Meticulous

    it means showing great attention to detail very careful and precise
    E.G he had always been so meticulous about his appearance.

    Comment by jasmine bazzica — May 19, 2010 @ 7:57 pm | Reply

  61. Kabbalistic-noun the ancient Jewish tradition of mystical interpretation of the Bible

    Comment by Emily Morrice — May 19, 2010 @ 7:52 pm | Reply

  62. My word of the day is: Eleemosynary.
    Meaning: (adjective) Charitable.
    (word power dictionary).

    Comment by shannon — May 18, 2010 @ 4:04 pm | Reply

  63. gadolinium-the chemical element of atomic number 64, a soft silvery-white metal of the lanthanide series.
    Dictionary (Science)

    Comment by Bec Waters 8 — May 18, 2010 @ 1:48 pm | Reply

  64. concealed-keep from sight; hide
    in christian studies

    Comment by Bec Waters 8 — May 18, 2010 @ 1:45 pm | Reply

  65. Abesquatulate: to leave in a hurry

    Galligaskins: loose-fitting pants

    Sternutate: sneeze

    Comment by Ella Tindal — May 17, 2010 @ 7:46 pm | Reply

  66. Word of the day!!!
    Heterogeneous– adjective
    Composed of parts or element of different kind.
    Example: a heterogeneous population.
    Laura Anderson =)

    Comment by Laura Anderson — May 17, 2010 @ 7:39 pm | Reply

  67. vacillated: alternate or waver between different opinions or actions

    Comment by Emily Morrice — May 17, 2010 @ 7:38 pm | Reply

  68. My other word of the day is: Popinjay
    Meaning: (noun) a vain or foppish person.
    (word power dictionary).

    Comment by shannon — May 17, 2010 @ 6:13 pm | Reply

  69. My word of the day is: Hara-kiri
    Meaning: (noun) ritual suicide by disembowelment with a sword, formerly practised in Japan by a samuri.
    (word power dictionary).

    Comment by shannon — May 17, 2010 @ 6:11 pm | Reply

  70. monotonous– laking in variety and interest

    (Lucy’s Speech was monotonous)

    Comment by Lucy Moffatt — May 17, 2010 @ 4:18 pm | Reply

  71. pacesetter-
    • a person or organization viewed as taking the lead or setting

    Comment by Emily Morrice — May 17, 2010 @ 8:22 am | Reply

  72. This word is absolutely superb, it makes your toes tingle with delight.
    CURMUDGEON:a bad tempered or surly person

    e.g That profesor, no matter how intelligent, is a curmudgeon

    Comment by Bella — May 16, 2010 @ 5:21 pm | Reply

  73. Loquacious-likes to talk- talkative

    Comment by Lucy — May 16, 2010 @ 12:16 pm | Reply

    • Is this a word I should use in your report comment? JK. Great word, Lucy!

      Comment by peterholford — May 16, 2010 @ 5:59 pm | Reply

  74. My word of the day is: Sesquipedalian
    Meaning: (adjective formal) (of a word) having many syllables; long.
    (Word Power Dictionary)

    Comment by shannon — May 16, 2010 @ 10:51 am | Reply

  75. ABACUS: an oblong frame with rows of wires or grooves along which beads are slid, used for calculating.

    Comment by catriona Graham — May 13, 2010 @ 10:45 am | Reply

  76. UBIQUITOUS

    means present, apperaring, or found everywhere

    Comment by jasmine bazzica — May 13, 2010 @ 10:34 am | Reply

  77. Word of the day, Year 9B..
    DEDUCE: To reach a conclusion/form an opinion based on facts.
    Sentence: I deduce that Molly (McNeil) is actually a sloth at heart

    Anna B

    Comment by Anna Brouwers — May 12, 2010 @ 7:26 pm | Reply

  78. CACOPHONY – harsh discordance of sound; dissonance: a cacophony of hoots, cackles, and wails.

    Comment by Holly McDonald — May 11, 2010 @ 8:36 pm | Reply

  79. I came across this word in my cookbook ( it looked rather delish) it probably doesn’t count but I fell lke a piece of marzipan when I read it.

    ZABAGLIONE – an italian dessert made of whipped egg yolks, sugar and wine.
    Yum!

    Comment by Bella — May 11, 2010 @ 6:45 pm | Reply

  80. My other word of the day is: POLIOMYELITIS
    Meaning: (noun) An infectious disease, caused by a virus, that affects the centeral nervous system and can cause tempoary or permanent paralysis.

    Comment by shannon — May 11, 2010 @ 5:33 pm | Reply

  81. My word of the day is: ICOSAHEDRON
    Meaning: (noun) a three dimensional shape having twenty plane faces, in particular a regular solid figure with twenty equal triangular faces.
    (Word Power Dictionary).

    Comment by shannon — May 11, 2010 @ 5:30 pm | Reply

  82. FLAMBOYANT -tending to attract attention because of their exuberance, confidence, and stylishness
    I found it in the book A rose for the Anzac boys

    Comment by Bec Waters 8 — May 11, 2010 @ 8:11 am | Reply

  83. QUERULOUSNESS: complaining in a petulant or whining manner

    Comment by Sophie M Yr 8A — May 10, 2010 @ 8:17 pm | Reply

  84. SUBAERIALLY -existing, occurring, or formed in the open air or on the earth’s surface, not underwater or underground.

    Comment by Bec Waters 8 — May 10, 2010 @ 7:31 pm | Reply

    • Hi Bec: I think your definition is for the adjective – subaerial. Subaerially is the adverbial form and would be slighly different – do you know what I mean?

      Comment by peterholford — May 10, 2010 @ 8:59 pm | Reply

      • probly is

        Comment by Bec Waters 8 — May 11, 2010 @ 3:43 pm

  85. ONEROUS: diffcult-requires hard labour

    Comment by Lucy Moffatt — May 9, 2010 @ 8:27 pm | Reply

  86. Wog – worker in Greece

    Comment by Emily Morrice — May 9, 2010 @ 8:22 pm | Reply

  87. My other word of the day is: OBSTREPEROUS
    Meaning: Noiseily and stubbornly defiant.
    (adjective) (factacular.com) and (dictionary.com)

    Comment by shannon — May 9, 2010 @ 3:43 pm | Reply

  88. My word of the day is: ODALISQUE.
    Meaning: A female slave or concubine in a Harem.
    (noun) (factacular.com) and (dictionary.com).

    Comment by shannon — May 9, 2010 @ 3:38 pm | Reply

  89. My word is PLATITUDE
    meaning-a remark or statement, esp. one with moral content, that has been used too often to be interesting or thoughtful.
    definition from the computer dictionary

    Comment by Geogia White — May 9, 2010 @ 12:33 pm | Reply

  90. VALETUDINARIAN
    Meaning: (noun) a person who is excessively concerned about keeping healthy.
    From: the Australian Integrated compact dictionary and thesaurus.

    Comment by Phoebe Parry — May 8, 2010 @ 12:35 pm | Reply

  91. LOAFER: a person who idles the time away

    Comment by Sophie M Yr 8A — May 8, 2010 @ 12:18 pm | Reply

  92. IRIDESCENT– adjective
    Showing luminous colours that seem to change when seen from different angles

    Comment by Emily Seery — May 8, 2010 @ 11:46 am | Reply

  93. VAINGLORIOUSNESS -noun inordinate pride in oneself or one’s achievements; excessive vanity.
    Dictionary on the computer

    Comment by Bec Waters 8 — May 7, 2010 @ 7:20 pm | Reply

  94. OAFISHNESS -a stupid, uncultured, or clumsy person.

    Comment by Emily Morrice 8 — May 7, 2010 @ 7:17 pm | Reply

    • Is your definition for OAF or OAFISHNESS? Both are nouns, but I think the first one is the person – the second one is the character of behaving in an oaf-like manner …

      Comment by peterholford — May 9, 2010 @ 9:56 pm | Reply

  95. My word of the day is: ABACULUS
    Meaning: A small mosaic tile usually made og marble or glass.
    (noun) (Factacular.com).

    Comment by shannon — May 7, 2010 @ 5:07 pm | Reply

  96. SLAPDASH -(adverb) In a reckless haphazard manner.
    (Haphazard means lacking any obvious principle of organization)

    Comment by Bec Waters 8 — May 7, 2010 @ 4:57 pm | Reply

    • From i-google words and the dictionary in my computer!!

      Comment by Bec Waters 8 — May 7, 2010 @ 4:59 pm | Reply

  97. zinciferous: containing zinc

    maquarie english dictionary

    Comment by Chrisy — May 7, 2010 @ 4:38 pm | Reply

  98. ZYMURGY: a branch of chemistry to do with fermentation as in wine making…

    maquarie encyclopedic dictionary

    Comment by Chrisy — May 7, 2010 @ 4:35 pm | Reply

  99. ZWITTERION : an ion carrying both positive and negative charge

    maquarie encyclopedic dictioary

    Comment by Chrisy — May 7, 2010 @ 4:32 pm | Reply

  100. ZOROASTRIANISM: a strongly ethical code which teaches both good and bad

    Comment by Chrisy — May 7, 2010 @ 4:29 pm | Reply

  101. OBERAMMERGAU– a village in the Baverian Alps of southwestern Germany

    Comment by brigitte — May 7, 2010 @ 2:27 pm | Reply

  102. PSYCHOSOMATIC: Adjective

    1. of or pertaining to a physical disorder that is caused by or notably influenced by emotional factors.
    2. pertaining to or involving both the mind and the body.
    Eg. Mum sent me to school because my illness was only Psychosomatic.

    Comment by phoebe — May 6, 2010 @ 7:53 pm | Reply

  103. My word is GUTTERSNIPE
    Meaning:(noun) a poor child who plays in the streets in a slum.
    from: the Australian Integrated Compact Dictionary and Thesaurus.

    Comment by Phoebe — May 5, 2010 @ 8:40 pm | Reply

  104. CULPABLE – (adjective) Deserving of blame or censure as being wrong, evil, improper, or injurious.

    Comment by Rebecca Waters 8 — May 5, 2010 @ 9:40 am | Reply

    • Don’t forget to name your source (the dictionary you used).

      Comment by peterholford — May 5, 2010 @ 7:32 pm | Reply

    • oh yea i got it from again i-google

      Comment by Rebecca Waters 8 — May 7, 2010 @ 4:08 pm | Reply

  105. My other word of the day is: GIMCRACK
    Meaning: Showy but flimsy or poorly made (adjective).
    From Agatha Christie’s novel After the funeral.

    Comment by shannon — May 4, 2010 @ 4:33 pm | Reply

  106. My word of the day is: FORAMINIFERA
    Meaning: single-celled planktonic animals with a perforated chalky shell. (plural noun)
    (word power dictionary)

    Comment by shannon — May 4, 2010 @ 4:29 pm | Reply

  107. my word of the day is PER-AMBLE and it means to wonder around and its were the word pram was derived from

    Comment by brigitte — May 4, 2010 @ 3:07 pm | Reply

    • Hi Brigitte – this is interesting. Where did you find it? I haven’t seen this word written quite this way before. I have heard PERAMBULATE which basically means the same thing: walk or travel through or round a place, and I do know that PERAMBULATOR is an old-fashioned term for PRAM, so what you’ve written does make sense.

      Comment by peterholford — May 4, 2010 @ 7:53 pm | Reply

  108. VAGABONDAGE: a person who wanders from place to place without a home or job.

    Comment by Eliza Pitt — May 3, 2010 @ 6:39 pm | Reply

    • Hi Eliza, are you sure it is ‘vagabondage’ and not just ‘vagabond’? I know both are words, but I think the definition you provided is for ‘vagabond’ – a person without a home. I wonder if ‘vagabondage’ is something like ‘the condition of being homeless’ or something like that …

      Comment by peterholford — May 3, 2010 @ 8:20 pm | Reply

  109. My word of the day is INTELLIGENTSIA
    Meaning: intellectual people regarded as a group
    As in: the intelligentsia (thats all there was)
    from the Australian integrated compact dictionary and thesaurus

    Comment by Phoebe Parry — May 2, 2010 @ 8:39 pm | Reply

  110. CONSTRUE
    (verb) Make sense of; assign a meaning to.

    Comment by Rebecca Waters 8 — May 2, 2010 @ 4:54 pm | Reply

  111. My other word of the day comes courtesy of After The Funeral by Agatha Christie
    Word: RHEUMY (ajective), But the word in the dictionary is: Rheum (noun)
    Meaning: a watery fluid that collects in or drips from the nose or eyes.
    (Readers digest – word power dictionary)

    Comment by shannon — May 1, 2010 @ 4:35 pm | Reply

    • Hi Shannon, this is exactly what I want you all to be doing: looking up words you come across in books you’re reading. Excellent! My dictionary has a definition for RHEUMY: (adjective) (especially of the eyes) full of rheum; watery. (Oxford Dictionary of English). I fixed ‘other’ for you. Make sure you read over your posts before you click ‘submit’!

      Comment by peterholford — May 1, 2010 @ 6:31 pm | Reply

  112. My other word of the day is: DOGMATIC
    Meaning: saying what you think very forcefully and expecting other to accept it as true.
    ( Maquarie Junior Dictionary – third edition)

    Comment by Shannon — May 1, 2010 @ 12:59 pm | Reply

  113. My word of the day is: ZITHER
    Meaning: a musical instrument that you pluck.
    (Maquarie Junior Dictionary – Third edition)

    Comment by Shannon — May 1, 2010 @ 12:56 pm | Reply

  114. ZYGOTE!!!, which means a cell formed by the union of two gametes.

    Comment by catriona Graham — April 30, 2010 @ 6:11 pm | Reply

  115. DESPICABLE!!!
    deserving hatred and contempt : a despicable crime.

    Comment by Rebecca Waters 8 — April 30, 2010 @ 9:31 am | Reply

  116. PANDEMONIUM
    the meaning is wild and noisy disorder or confusion; uproar from the computer dictionary.

    Comment by GeorgiaWhite 8A — April 30, 2010 @ 8:24 am | Reply

    • Okay Georgia – this is a great word – definitely as good as ETHEREAL. Remind me when we get to English today …

      Comment by peterholford — April 30, 2010 @ 9:57 am | Reply

  117. HULLABALOO: a commotion or fuss

    Comment by Eliza Pitt — April 29, 2010 @ 7:39 pm | Reply

  118. My word of the day is ETHEREAL!
    Meaning- extremely light and delicate in a way that seems too perfect
    as in- a singer who has a weirdly ethereal voice.
    from the Macbook dictionary

    Comment by Phoebe Parry — April 29, 2010 @ 6:30 pm | Reply

  119. My word of the day is LIRIPIPE.
    meaning: a long tail hanging from the back of a hood, esp. in medieval or academic dress.
    computer dictionary

    Comment by Georgia White 8A — April 29, 2010 @ 10:40 am | Reply

  120. Our Word of the day is: CHELA

    Dictionary Meaning: a pincerlike claw, esp. of a crab or other crustacean.

    Comment by Sophie M and Georgia W Yr 8A — April 28, 2010 @ 10:57 am | Reply

  121. Word of the is….LILANGENI– noun: the basic unit in Swaziland equal to 100 cents. The plural of this word is…EMALANGENI.

    Comment by Emily (Jelly) — April 27, 2010 @ 8:45 pm | Reply

  122. My word for today is POP!!!
    Meaning: (verb) to make a sudden, sharp, explosive sound.
    e.g. the corks made a popping sound.
    (from the macbook dictionary)

    Comment by Phoebe Parry — April 27, 2010 @ 5:59 pm | Reply

    • Okay – that’s fair enough, but not a very interesting word … more impressive would be popinjay (noun) a vain or conceited person, especially one who dresses or behaves extravagantly OR popliteal (adjective) relating to or situated in the hollow at the back of the knee! Both from the Oxford Dictionary of English.

      Comment by peterholford — April 27, 2010 @ 6:35 pm | Reply

  123. My word of the day is BEDRAGGLED!
    BEDRAGGLED is an adjective that means very untidy, wet and dirty.

    Comment by Laura Brown (LOZ) — April 27, 2010 @ 5:46 pm | Reply

    • Hey Laura – I like it. I always think of a cat that’s been caught in the rain when I think of ‘bedraggled’. I owe you a Chupa Chup.

      Comment by peterholford — April 27, 2010 @ 6:31 pm | Reply

  124. My word of the day is INGOT!!!!!
    Meaning: (noun) A block of metal which has been melted and poured into a mould.
    Definition From: Maqurie Junior Dictionary – third edition.

    Comment by Shannon — April 26, 2010 @ 4:05 pm | Reply

  125. My word of the day is TILDER!!!!!
    Meaning: (its not in a dictionary or on the internet that i could find but it exists)
    its this symbol ~

    Comment by Phoebe Parry — April 24, 2010 @ 2:28 pm | Reply

    • Hi Phoebe – yes, it’s a good word. The reason you couldn’t find it in the dictionary is because it is spelled differently. Here it is from my dictionary:

        TILDE (noun) an accent (~) place over Spanish ‘n’ when pronounced ‘ny’ (as in senor) or Portuguese ‘a’ or ‘o’ when nasalized (as in ‘Sao Paulo’), or over a vowel in phonetic transcription, indicating nasalization. Oxford Dictionary of English.

      Sounds complicated, doesn’t it? You’ll probably never need it in English, but still – I like knowing what to call that key in the top left hand corner of my keyboard!

      Comment by peterholford — April 24, 2010 @ 3:25 pm | Reply

  126. My word of the day is EXTRAVAGANT!!!!
    Meaning: (adjective) Spending more than you need to.
    eg. ‘An extravagant person.’
    From Macquarie junior dictionary – third edition.

    Comment by Shannon 8A — April 23, 2010 @ 3:35 pm | Reply

    • Hi Shannon, great word. I fixed the spelling error you pointed out. I’ll reward this one with a Chupa Chup. Remind me.

      Comment by peterholford — April 23, 2010 @ 7:18 pm | Reply

  127. wickedly fizzen

    Comment by pitty and loz — April 23, 2010 @ 2:10 pm | Reply

    • Hi girls. You were definitely the first since Mrs Morley to post on this site, but you just haven’t given enough information for a word (or phrase) of the day! I don’t mind if the word is colloquial (look it up) but you need to write a definition for it and use it in a sentence!

      Comment by peterholford — April 23, 2010 @ 7:16 pm | Reply

  128. Word of the day for today comes courtesy of Chrissy in 8A:
    FLABBERGAST(verb): to surprise someone greatly; astonish. For example, ‘this news has left me totally flabbergasted’
    Definition from the Oxford Dictionary of English.

    Comment by peterholford — April 20, 2010 @ 12:11 pm | Reply


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